Sunday, April 15, 2018

Links I Love 4/15/18



Kristi Mraz on Being the Change

"What is Social Comprehension, and Do Little Kids Need it?
Sara defines social comprehension as developing “skills and habits to help us comprehend social issues and participate in relevant, transparent conversations.” She points out that this skill is learned, and to me, that means we need to be teaching it from the first day of school in kindergarten. It is more than just having the skills of conversation. Though that is certainly part of it, it is also normalizing difficult conversations and studying the impact of our actions on others so that we may learn better and do better. Little kids are more than capable of talking about big issues when we approach it in a way that feels appropriate and connected to their lives. It will be messy and clumsy at the start, but what isn’t?"

Embracing Student-Generated Questions in the Classroom 

"The research on student-generated questioning is compelling; questioning pushes students forward in making meaning of information. Students in inquiry-based classrooms demonstrate higher test scores. Brain scans reveal that when learners’ curiosity is piqued by questions, the parts of the brain associated with pleasure, reward, and memory undergo an increase in activity. Questioning generation improves students’ reading comprehension and promotes positives attitudes about reading and literacy."

Parent-Tested, Expert-Recommended Advice for When Your Child Isn't Reading Yet 

"Don’t judge. This is the cardinal rule, and the one I break all the time. So your child isn’t reading in first grade. So what? You can start labeling or comparing, or you can accept the situation as it is, and work with it."


“What you cannot imagine, you cannot do”

Now imagine Astronauts on the Space Station reading stories to the children of Earth as the world rotates below.
Imagine no more…it’s Story Time from Space!


A Few of My Favourite Blog Posts - to Read...or Inspire Writing

"I was asked the other day by another professional to share some blog posts that have inspired me.  She was curious about starting up her own blog and wanted to read through a few different writers’ works to get some inspiration.  To be honest, there are so many great educators posting wonderful blog posts that it is difficult to narrow it down.  Here is my attempt at creating a list of some of my favourite blog posts from the past few years.  Find one you haven’t read and take a look."

The 5 Practices Framework: Explicit Planning vs. Explicit Teaching

"Trust me, I get it. The word “explicit” has developed a cringe-worthy connotation among peers in the math community. In the past, if I were asked to paint a picture of a math teacher engaging in “explicit” teaching, I would have painted either a teacher standing up at the front of the room, telling students how to solve a problem, or a teacher crouched down next to a struggling student, “correcting” the way the student approached the problem because they were taking the “long way there.”

Promoting Productive Struggle in Math 

"Math hooks changed the feel in class right away. There was confusion, conversation, wonder mixed with frustration, some magical revelations, and lots and lots of rigorous thinking. This was all exactly what I was looking for."

What is a Number String?

"A number string is a set of related math problems, crafted to support students to construct big ideas about mathematics and build their own strategies (Fosnot & Dolk, 2002)."

Using Math Routines to Build Number Sense in First Grade

"Every time we do this routine, I find students building on one another’s ideas, challenging themselves, and getting excited about the different ways they can represent a number. I hear cheers and gasps as other students share their answers. This routine not only builds an understanding of how numbers are composed and decomposed, but it is also an engaging way for students to dive deeper into the meaning of numbers, which sets the foundation for future mathematical experiences. The conversations this routine spurs surprise me time and time again."